Difference Between Amish and Mennonite (With Table)

Amish vs Mennonite

We find religious diversity across the world but most religions stem from the same religion. And in Europe, this diversification is more prominent and visible.

Almost all religion talks about a certain belief system and different practices to show how well it can bring the positivity in follower’s life. Similarities do exist but dissimilarities are easy to mark.

Amish and Mennonite are two such Christian groups whose roots are the same but with time they got divided, changed, and developed different belief systems.

Although still people find it hard to mark a difference between Amish and Mennonite but knowing their history can help them to learn their cultural differentiation.

Both, Amish and Mennonite, belong to the Anabaptists group where their basis of belief system was in the simplicity of faith and their practices are retrieved from the Bible. And this base is still followed by them.

Amish group was founded by Jakob Ammann, who believed that any kind of sin needs a serious punishment. Many people get attracted to this concept of Jacob Amann and started following it. Whereas, another group named as Mennonites followed the same old peaceful practices of Anabaptists.

Amish follow traditional and very strict practices Anabaptists. They don’t get involved with other people in the world and don’t believe in technology adoption. They dress very plain traditional clothes and travel through buggies or scooters.

Mennonites are known as a non-violent and flexible group of Anabaptists. They embrace and adopt the latest technology in their daily life. They are involved more in missionary work to help deprived people and spread their belief & faith across the world.


 

Comparison Table Between Amish and Mennonite (in Tabular Form)

Parameter of ComparisonAmishMennonite
FollowersAnabaptistsAnabaptists
FounderJakob AmmannFrisian Menno Simons
Type of Attire Plain Traditional Clothes.Normal Similar to Modern Look.
Mode Of TransportationScooters and Buggies i.e. a horse-drawn vehicle.Modern Automobiles i.e. cars, buses, trains, etc.
Language At Church ServicesGerman or the regular dialect of German or Pennsylvania Dutch.English.
Use of TechnologyAmish prohibit the use of modern technology in their life.Mennonites moderately use modern technology in day-to-day life.
LivingSimple and in groups i.e. close-knit communities, not like to a part of the other separate communities.Simple and they live as a part of the normal population. Not in separate communities.
Followers of Amish strictly follows the non-resistance. A person who doesn’t follow church rules will be excommunicated.Mennonites follow non-violence.
Hold Church ServicesPrivately at home.Always at Church.
Dressing1) Women wear solid-color dresses.

2) Men have full beards
1) Women wear flowered prints or plaid fabric.

2) Men don’t have a full beard.

 

What is Amish?

Amish belong to the North American Christian group, formerly belonged to the Anabaptists group. Amish group was founded by Jakob Ammann in the late 17the century.

Jakob Ammann was a reluctant and strong believer of ex-communication i.e. if anybody doesn’t follow the laid rules of religion and lie, he/she will be shunned from the community.

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He was a non-resistance believer too but sturdily favored social shunning of people who are involved in any kind of wrongdoings.

Amish people live in close-knit communities that are separated from the mainstream world. They follow very stringent customs, life, and behavior rules that are not specifically written but exist and known as Ordnung.

German or the regular dialect of German or Pennsylvania Dutch is the language used by Amish people for communication at church and English in daily life at home.

Amish people do the Church services at home within the closed community on a rotational basis. They wear very plain clothes that are known as a nonconformist lifestyle. Amish man has a full beard without mustaches and women wear solid-color dresses without any jewelry.

Amish group strictly prohibits the use of technology of any kind. And the mode of transportation is a horse-driven vehicle or scooter.

Amish
Amish
 

What is Mennonite?

Mennonites’ group was a result of the 16th-century reformation movement that comes out from Anabaptists. It was named after Frisian Menno Simons, a Dutch priest, who tried to institutionalize the workings of moderate Anabaptist leaders.

Mennonites’ belief and faith systems revolve around human betterment where they try to help the poor of any section. They live commonly among the normal population, not in close-knit communities.

They believe in belongingness and are known as peacemakers. The German language was used by them in the late 16th century but later they adopted English as their common communication language at home as well as at Church.

Mennonites gives more emphasis on one’s pacifist and conscience to worship God. They believe that religion and the rest world should not be mixed and should be followed separately.

They follow rigorous religious practices and discipline in their group. They live a simple life with simple clothing but yes evolved with time and are involved in the advancements about education, social, and economical fronts.

Mennonites moderately use modern technology in day-to-day life. And also use automobiles for transportation.

Mennonite scaled

Main Differences Between Amish and Mennonite

To summarize, the main difference between Amish and Mennonite are,

  1. Amish was founded by Jakob Ammann, whereas Mennonites founded by Frisian Menno Simons.
  2. Amish live a very simple life, whereas Mennonites are little evolved to modern lifestyle.
  3. The use of technology is strictly prohibited in the Amish community, whereas, Mennonites moderately use the technology in their daily life.
  4. For Amish, the mode of transportation is a horse-driven vehicle or scooter, whereas Mennonites use the modern automobile for transportation.
  5. Amish man has a full beard, whereas Mennonite men don’t have a full beard.
  6. Amish women wear solid-color dresses, whereas Mennonite women wear flowered prints or plaid fabric.
  7. Amish people live in close-knit communities and don’t become part of the other population, whereas Mennonite lives as a part of the population not as separate communities.
  8. Amish strictly follow the non-resistance, whereas Mennonites follow non-violence and are known as peacemakers.
  9. Amish hold Church services at home, whereas Mennonites hold church services at church only.

 

Conclusion

To understand the history of any religion or community, we need to find their point of origin. Today many Christian groups in Europe and England got originated from different movements.

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Although, all communities are different and hold different faith and belief systems. We may found some anomalies in these groups or communities but most of them are having their basic essence from the same roots.

All follow Christ and talk about Christianity discipleship. And this is also true that they are developing, evolving, and changing with time.

There is much more in their history, theology, and beliefs, so just a few words can only tell a few differences between Amish and Mennonite, to know the reality of basis and existence one needs to learn more.


 

Word Cloud for Difference Between Amish and Mennonite

The following is a collection of the most used terms in this article on Amish and Mennonite. This should help in recalling related terms as used in this article at a later stage for you.

Difference Between Amish and Mennonite
Word Cloud for Amish and Mennonite

 

References

  1. https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=1MSzboiBfrkC&oi=fnd&pg=PP13&dq=Amish+vs+Mennonite&ots=Fyb6ISsigd&sig=BYmQGcKrEoply4dGMXMJ8He1Ezc
  2. https://www.etown.edu/centers/young-center/files/hmorton-references/Pediatric%20Medicine%20and%20Genetics%202003.pdf
  3. https://repository.lboro.ac.uk/articles/Physical_activity_profile_of_old_order_Amish_Mennonite_and_contemporary_children/9626393/files/17275031.pdf