Difference Between Bank Rate and MSF Rate (With Table)

Bank Rate vs MSF Rate

The key difference between Bank Rate and MSF Rate lies in the fact that the central bank provides funds to commercial banks and financial institutions for a discounted rate, which is known as the bank rate.

On the contrary, MSF (Marginal Standing Facility) rate is a rate on which the central bank issues money overnight to commercial banks. Bank rate was introduced in the year 1900, while the MSF rate was introduced in the year of 2011.

Bank rate is the interest at which the Central Bank of any nation provides a loan to its domestic banks. It is usually given against government securities and for a shorter or a longer period of time.

MSF rate is the rate charged by the Central bank of the nation (RBI) to its domestic banks when there is an emergency such as the complete drying of inter-bank liquidity.

It is applicable only for a very short period and the banks can borrow just one percent of their entire demand.


 

Comparison Table Between Bank Rate and MSF Rate (in Tabular Form)

Parameter of comparisonBank RateMSF Rate
What is it?Interest at which the nation’s central bank loans its domestic banksThe rate at which the nation’s central bank loans its domestic banks during an emergency situation.
Periodloan lasts for shorter or longer periodloan lasts for a very short period
The interest rate charged by the national bankUsually nominalUsually high
What happens when it is lower?Lower Bank rate helps in expanding the economy as the cost of funds are really less for the borrowersLower MSF rate means there is no emergency for funds and the economy is doing well
What happens when it is higher?It helps in bringing back the currency value when there is higher inflationIt is usually higher so that the domestic banks manage their demands by its own
When it is loaned?Any timeUsually loaned overnight
Who can borrow?Any commercial bank or any financial institutionOnly Scheduled Commercial Banks (SCB) that are linked to the central bank
Is there any limit?Limited to the government securities that are providedUsually limited to one percent of the net demand.
When is it introduced?In practice for so many years, and also in different nationsReserve Bank of India (RBI) had introduced it in its 2011-2012 monetary policy
Other namesIt is also called as discount rateIt is also called as overnight rate
How is it calculated?The National bank of the country determines it based on monetary policyMSF rate = Repo rate + 1%
Which is lower?As it is issued for loans of a longer period, it is lower than the MSF.As it is issued for overnight loans under financial emergencies, it is higher than the Bank rate.

 

What is Bank Rate?

Bank rate is the interest percentage at which the country’s national bank loans its domestic banks. Bank rate plays a major role in determining the economic activities of the country.

RECOMMENDED  Difference Between Mobile Banking and Internet Banking (With Table)

The higher bank rate helps in restoring the inflation whereas the lower bank rate helps in expanding the economy. As the bank rate is usually issued for loans of a longer period, it is lower than the MSR rate.  

Chart showing UK Bank Rates
 

What is MSF Rate?

MSF stands for Marginal Standing Facility (MSF) and the MSF rate is the rat eat which the National bank borrows its domestic banks in case of any emergency, especially, when there is complete drying of inter-bank liquidity.

It is made higher to ensure that such a situation shouldn’t occur often. Also, Marginal Standing Facility is offered only for a very short period.

MSF rate is calculated by adding one to the repo rate, where the repo rate is the rate at which the national bank lends to its local banks for short terms.

MSF rate = Repo rate + 1%

Chart showing Indian MSF Rates

Main Differences Between Bank Rate and MSF Rate

  1. Bank rate is the interest rate at which the national bank borrows its domestic banks when the inter-bank liquidity dries up whereas the MSF rate is the rate at which the nation’s central bank borrows its domestic banks in case of any emergencies.
  2. The former loan rates last for a shorter or longer period and the latter lasts for a very short time.
  3. The interest rate charged as Bank rates are nominal whereas the MSF rate charged is higher.
  4. Lower the Bank rate is the higher the country’s economy gets expand but the lower the MSF rate is the higher the emergency for funds among the domestic banks.
  5. On the contrary, when the Bank rate is higher, it brings back the currency value reducing the inflation. Higher MSF rate ensures that the domestic banks ask for help to the central bank less often.
  6. Bank rate loans can occur at any time whereas the MSF rate loans usually occur overnight.
  7.  Any commercial bank or any financial institution can borrow from the central bank. Only Scheduled Commercial Banks (SCB) that are linked to the Central bank can avail loans are MSF rate.
  8. The former loans are limited to the government securities provided whereas the latter loans are limited to one percent of the net demand.
  9.  Bank rate is in use for so many years around the world whereas the MSF rate was first introduced by Reserve Bank of India (RBI) in its monetary policy 2011-2012.
  10. Bank rate is also called as discount rate and the MSF rate is also called as overnight rate as it is borrowed overnight.
  11. The former rate is determined by the National bank of the country based on the monetary policy whereas the latter is calculated by adding one percent to the repo rate. Repo rate is the rate at which the national banks lends to its domestic banks for a shorter period.      
RECOMMENDED  Difference Between Public Sector and Private Sector Banks (With Table)

 

How to Remember the Difference Between Bank Rate and MSF Rate

Time Needed : 2 minutes

Remembering the differences is very simple, just follow our mind mapping guide given below:

  1. Associate the first word with a thing or item which you see daily

    For e.g.: Middle line in letter H for Horizontal.

  2. Associate the second word with a thing or item which you see daily

    For e.g.: The two lines in letter V for Vertical.

  3. Recall the two words daily two times

    During morning and evening bring up the two words in front of you and then recall the things that you had associated with each word.

  4. Repeat for 7 days

    Repeating this process for a week will help you remember the difference between words for a long time.


 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Bank Rate and MSF Rate

  1. Why MSF is higher than repo rate?

    MSF is the short form of the Marginal Standing Facility. It is provided to banks for overnight funds against government securities. It is quite a short period to provide funds, hence the charge is more for the MSF rate.

    MSF rates are higher than the repo rate by 25bps. It is more expensive for banks to borrow funds on the MSF rate on an overnight basis. MSF rate is always above the repo rate due to the fast transaction of funds.

  2. Why was MSF introduced?

    MSF (Marginal Standing Facility) was established on 9th May 2011.

    It was introduced to provide funds on a particular rate to the banks from the Central Bank on an overnight basis.

    RBI (Reserve Bank of India) announced this scheme to maintain liquidity.

  3. Who introduced MSF?

    MSF (Marginal Standing Facility) was come into existence by RBI (Reserve Bank of India). It was introduced to support banks for overnight liquidity with a higher interest rate.

    In MSF, banks can borrow loans from RBI even if they don’t have eligible securities. So, to solve the problem of liquidity, MSF was established.

  4. Why does RBI borrow money from banks?

    Reverse Repo Rate means when RBI (Reserve Bank of India) has to borrow money from banks to absorb excess liquidity in the market. It restricts the investors in terms of borrowing power.

    RBI applies Reverse Repo Rate when the inflation of the economy is high. Hence RBI raises reverse repo to control inflation.

    It makes the banks to deposit their funds with RBI to receive interest on their funds. Therefore, a bank has less money to issue it to the consumers for borrowings or loans.

  5. How is the repo rate calculated?

    There are two legs of repo rate, which is First Leg and Second Leg. The First Leg means when the repo borrower sells his securities for funds to the repo lender.

    The Second Leg means when the repo borrower purchases his sold securities on an interest rate from the repo lender.

    The First Leg of the repo rate is calculated by adding the price of the bond with the accrued interest.

    The Second Leg of the repo rate is calculated by adding interest rates. It has to be paid by the repo borrower on the actual sum he borrowed.

  6. How much can banks borrow under MSF?

    Eligible banks can borrow up to 1% of their NDTL (Net Demand and Time Liabilities) from the RBI under MSF. The rate can later increase to 2%.

RECOMMENDED  Difference Between Accounting Profit and Taxable Profit (With Table)

 

Infographic

Bank Rate vs MSF Rate

 

Learn More With the Help of Video


 

Conclusion

Bank rate and MSF rate are both interest percentages charged by the nation’s central bank to its domestic banks or financial institutions (only in the case of the former), but they differ in the situation when they are borrowed.

For example, the former is borrowed when there is a complete dry up in the liquidity of the inter-banks whereas the latter is borrowed when there is a financial emergency for any domestic bank.

To reduce such emergency borrows, the central bank usually sets the MSF rate higher whereas the Bank rates are usually nominal.    


 

Word Cloud for Difference Between Bank Rate and MSF Rate

The following is a collection of the most used terms in this article on Bank Rate and MSF Rate. This should help in recalling related terms as used in this article at a later stage for you.

Word Cloud for Bank Rate and MSF Rate

 

References

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bank_rate
  2. https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/definition/marginal-standing-facility
  3. https://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/bankrate.asp

He is the founder of AskAnyDifference and has the authority to write on topics like Finance, IT, Law and Science. The Wall Street Journal calls him a top differentiator on the web, Forbes says he owns one of the top websites about "Difference Between" various terms, and Entrepreneur Magazine says he founded one of the 100 most brilliant ideas.

Leave a Comment