Difference Between Food Processor and Blender (With Table)

A food processor and blender are kitchen appliances that share various similarities. Both have rotating blades, cylindrical bodies and even the same settings. However, they are not interchangeable. This is because each of them has a different function. Telling them apart can often be confusing while choosing the right equipment for day-to-day cooking prep.

Food Processor vs Blender

The difference between food processor and blender is that a food processor is designed to be used for a variety of functions including shredding, chopping, grating, dicing, slicing and much more. On the other hand, a blender is specifically used to puree ingredients and often to combine wet and dry ingredients together.

A food processor is an electrical appliance that takes away the burden of manual work in the kitchen. It carries out a variety of functions that are generally done while prepping ingredients for meals. The razor-sharp blades present inside the machine can slice through thick foods. In most cases, the result is still solid.

Meanwhile, a blender is another electrical appliance that is used to pulverize and combine different ingredients. It turns solid foods into liquids. They are most commonly used to make smoothies and soups. The blades present inside a blender are more powerful than that of a food processor to achieve this purpose.

Comparison Table Between Food Processor and Blender

Parameters of ComparisonFood ProcessorBlender
FunctionA food processor is used to slice through thick ingredients easily while preparing food.A blender is used to pulverize food and often to combine wet and dry ingredients.
BladeFood processors may come with multiple blades that are relatively less powerful.Blenders have a fixed blade that is more powerful than the former.
BodyFood processors have a wide work jar.Blenders have a narrow conical shape.
ResultThe result may be liquid or solid.The result is in the form of a liquid.
UsesIt can be used for shredding, chopping, grating, dicing, slicing, etc.It can be used to make smoothies and soups.

What is Food Processor?

A food processor is a kitchen appliance that removes the burden of doing repetitive and cumbersome tasks while preparing food. It is an electric machine that carries out functions including shredding, chopping, grating, dicing, slicing, etc. It can even pulverize and combine wet and dry ingredients. However, it is not always necessary to add a liquid while processing.

The architecture of a food processor includes a motor at its base which rotates in a vertical motion. Its shaft has a bowl around it which is placed on top of this motor. Then, cutting blades are attached to the motor, which can often be changed with other kinds. Lastly, a lid is fitted on top of the bowl so that the ingredients stay inside it.

Moreover, the lid has a ‘feed tube’ which is a small hole that allows ingredients to be added during processing. A pusher is provided as well by most companies. This goes through the feed tube to push the ingredients towards the blade while protecting the users’ fingers. If the bowl is not placed properly on top of the base, the motor does not start in most cases.

Regardless, the first electric food processor was built in 1946 and it pretty much resembled a blender extensively. However, many updates were made over the years to increase its functionality.

What is Blender?

A blender is another kitchen appliance that looks very similar to a food processor. However, it has a different function. It is specifically used to pulverize, mix, crush and emulsify ingredients. Some models of it can even be used to crush ice. However, a certain amount of liquid must be added most of the time, to allow proper blending.

This machine has many characteristics that help a person choose which one to buy while purchasing. Some include ease of cleaning, power usage, noise during blending, visible measurement marks and ease of use. Based on this, a customer may choose which blender suits them best. However, in most cases, expensive blenders have these characteristics in a better form as compared to the cheap ones.

Blenders have quite a similar design as food processors. An electric motor is present at the base with a bowl attached to its shaft. Inside this is a cutting blade. However, unlike food processors, this blade is fixed to the machine and cannot be changed. The top of the bowl has a lid on it, but blenders do not have a feeding tube.

 The first blender was designed in 1919 by the Polish American chemist Stephen Poplawski. Then, it was made to prepare Horlicks and milkshakes at soda fountains.

Main Differences Between Food Processor and Blender

  1. A food processor is used to slice through thick ingredients easily while preparing food whereas a blender is used to pulverize food and often to combine wet and dry ingredients.
  2. Food processors may come with multiple blades that are relatively less powerful whereas blenders have a fixed blade that is more powerful than the former.
  3. Food processors have a wide work jar whereas blenders have a narrow conical shape.
  4. The result of food processing may e solid or liquid whereas that of blending is always liquid.
  5. Food processors can be used for shredding, chopping, grating, dicing, slicing, etc. whereas blenders can be used to make smoothies and soups.

Conclusion

Food processors and blenders have a similar architectural design which can often make it confusing to tell them apart. However, subtle differences in its architecture may help the cause. While food processors have a wide work jar with detachable blades inside it, blenders have a narrow conical jar with a fixed blade. Moreover, the blade of a food processor is not as powerful as the latter.

The most notable difference however is that they have different functions. Food processors are generally used for cutting through ingredients whereas blenders are used to combine and pulverize them. This means the result of food processing is generally in a solid form whereas that of blending is in liquid form.

References

  1. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10665-018-9968-4
  2. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/6869593/
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