Difference Between Lymphatic Capillaries and Blood Capillaries (With Table)

Lymphatic capillaries are those capillaries that are solely responsible for the Lymphatic system’s maintenance and completion. Blood capillaries are capillaries that are responsible for completing the circulatory system in the body. Blood capillaries have a smaller diameter than lymphatic capillaries. Blood capillaries are less permeable than lymphatic capillaries.

Lymphatic Capillaries vs Blood Capillaries

The difference between Lymphatic Capillaries and Blood Capillaries is that a lymphatic capillary has a substantially bigger diameter than a blood capillary. Lymphatic capillaries are more permeable than their counterparts. The constituents of lymphatic capillaries are normally drained into the lymphatic duct on the right side and the thoracic duct. Whereas the contents of blood capillaries are frequently drained into the venules.

Lymphatic capillaries contain lymph, which is an intercellular and interstitial fluid that is translucent to transparent white. WBCs, or white blood cells, are, nonetheless a component of the lymph that circulates throughout the body. The lymphatic Capillaries’ major function is to aid in the absorption of surplus tissue fluid. The endothelial cells make up one layer of the Lymphatic Capillaries, which likewise have closed ends.

Blood capillaries contain a red-coloured fluid called blood, which contains platelets, white blood cells, red blood cells, and plasma, as well as platelets, white blood cells, and red blood cells. The fundamental function of the blood capillaries is to assist in the delivery of useful nutrients to the tissues, such as oxygen. In the case of blood capillaries, the only layer is the endothelium, which forms a single layer. The blood capillaries, on the other hand, make a loop here.

Comparison Table Between Lymphatic Capillaries and Blood Capillaries

Parameters of ComparisonLymphatic Capillaries Blood Capillaries
System associatedLymphatic systemCirculatory system
Main FluidLymphBlood
DrainageRight Lymphatic duct and the thoracic duct.Venule
Main workAbsorption of the tissue fluid in excess.Providing useful substances to the tissues, ex- Oxygen.
PermeabilityMore permeable Less Permeable

What are Lymphatic Capillaries?

The diameter of a lymphatic capillary is significantly bigger than the diameter of a blood capillary. Lymphatic capillaries contain lymph, an intercellular and interstitial fluid that is translucent to clear white. WBCs, or white blood cells, are a type of lymph that circulates throughout the body. Lymphatic capillaries are known to be more permeable than blood capillaries.

The major function of Lymphatic Capillaries is to aid in the absorption of surplus tissue fluid. Lymphatic capillaries are capillaries that are solely responsible for maintaining and completing the Lymphatic system. The endothelial cells in the Lymphatic Capillaries make up one layer, and the capillaries have closed ends.

The lymphatic capillaries convey and receive any form of interstitial fluid or filtered plasma from the blood. After that, they clump together to produce lymph, a transparent fluid that contains only white blood cells, which are essential for immunity. The constituents of lymphatic capillaries are normally drained into the lymphatic duct on the right side as well as the thoracic duct.

What are Blood Capillaries?

The diameter of blood capillaries is less than that of lymphatic capillaries. The blood capillaries contain a crimson-coloured fluid termed blood, which contains platelets, white blood cells, red blood cells, and plasma, as well as platelets, white blood cells, and red blood cells.

When compared to their lymphatic counterparts, blood capillaries are considered to be less permeable. The major function of blood capillaries is to assist in the delivery of important molecules to the tissues, such as oxygen. Blood capillaries are those capillaries in the body that solely complete the circulatory system.

Only endothelium forms a single layer in blood capillaries. The blood capillaries, on the other hand, form a loop. Blood capillaries enable gas exchange, blood transportation, the transfer of necessary nutrients into the cell, and the outflow of undesired wastes from the cell. The venules are where blood capillaries drain their components.

Main Differences Between Lymphatic Capillaries and Blood Capillaries

  1. The diameter possessed by a lymphatic capillary is comparatively much larger than the diameter of the blood capillary. On the other hand, the diameter of the blood capillary is smaller in size as compared to the lymphatic capillary.
  2. Lymphatic capillaries contain a translucent to transparent white coloured fluid, called lymph, which is an intercellular and interstitial fluid. However, WBCs or white blood cells are also a part of lymph that flows through the system. On the other hand, the blood capillaries contain a red coloured fluid called blood, which includes platelets, White blood cells, Red blood cells, along plasma.
  3. Lymphatic capillaries are known to be comparatively more permeable than its counterpart. On the other hand, the Blood Capillaries are known to be less permeable as compared to their counterpart, lymphatic capillaries.
  4. The main work of Lymphatic Capillaries is that they help in the absorption of the tissue fluid, which is present in excessive amounts. On the other hand, the main work of the Blood Capillaries is that they help in providing useful substances such as oxygen to the tissues.
  5. Lymphatic capillaries are those capillaries that exclusively takes care of and complete the Lymphatic system. On the other hand, Blood Capillaries are those capillaries that exclusively complete the whole circulatory system in the body.
  6. The structure of the Lymphatic Capillaries is such that it is made up of one layer by constituting the endothelial cells and also possess closed ends. On the other hand, in the case of blood capillaries, it only consists of endothelium, making it up into a single layer only. However, here a loop is formed by the blood capillaries.
  7. Either any type of interstitial fluid or filtered plasma of blood is transported and received by the lymphatic capillaries. After that, they accumulate to form a type of clear fluid, lymph which exclusively carries white blood cells, which are important for boosting up immunity. On the other hand, enabling the exchange of gases, transportation of blood, movement of useful nutrients into the cell and outflow of unwanted wastes out from the cell are some of the important functions done by Blood Capillaries.
  8. The lymphatic capillaries usually drain their constituents into both the lymphatic duct on the right side and the thoracic duct. On the other hand, the blood capillaries usually drain their constituents into the venules.

Conclusion

A lymphatic capillary’s diameter is significantly greater than a blood capillary’s diameter. Lymph, an intercellular and interstitial fluid, is contained in lymphatic capillaries and is translucent to transparent white. White blood cells, or WBCs, are a component of the lymph that circulates throughout the body. The lymphatic Capillaries’ primary function is to assist in the absorption of surplus tissue fluid.

Platelets, White blood cells, Red blood cells, and plasma are all found in the blood capillaries. The major function of blood capillaries is to assist in the delivery of essential nutrients to tissues such as oxygen. Blood capillaries are those capillaries in the body that exclusively complete the circulatory system. Endothelium forms a single layer in blood capillaries. Blood capillaries, on the other hand, form a loop here.

Lymphatic capillaries are capillaries that are solely responsible for the Lymphatic system’s maintenance and completion. The endothelial cells form one layer in the Lymphatic Capillaries, which likewise have closed ends. However, Blood capillaries enable the interchange of gases, the transit of blood, the movement of beneficial nutrients into the cell, and the outflow of undesired wastes from the cell. The elements of blood capillaries are normally discharged into the venules.

References

  1. https://europepmc.org/article/med/1269772
  2. https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00795-009-0473-8.pdf
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