Difference Between Sperm and Cervical Mucus (With Table)

In living organisms either, animal or human beings, reproductive systems are present to produce offspring. During our school times, the first time we encounter reproduction. We become aware that in human beings, many discharges come out from the reproductive organs. Sperms and cervical mucus are the two fluids that discharge from the reproductive organs.

Sperm vs Cervical Mucus

The difference between sperms and cervical mucus is that Sperms are mainly present in men, while cervical mucus is present in the female. Sperms are present in the testicles, while Cervical mucus is present in cervical linings. The color of sperm is usually white, while the color of cervical mucus is mostly transparent.

Sperms are part of the male reproductive system. Sperm is produced in testicles. It is present in semen and, the semen in which the sperms are present is found in the urethral gland, prostate gland, and seminal vehicles. It unites with female reproductive organs and produces offspring. It contains sperm cells and other enzymes.

Cervical mucus is found in females. It is present in the cervical linings. It is made up of water and contains some electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, protein, glucose, amino acids. It also contains glycerol which, produced lubricant during the time of intercourse. It may protect sperms during the time of ovulation.

Comparison Table Between Sperm and Cervical Mucus

Parameters of Comparison SpermCervical mucus
PresenceThe semen in which the sperm is contained is produced in urethral gland, prostate gland, and seminal vesicles.It is produced in the cervical linings.
colour It is generally white.It is mostly transparent.
Contains It contains sperm cells and proteins.It contains water, glycerol, minerals, etc.
Shape The shape of normal sperm has a smooth, oval-shaped head that is 5-6 micrometers long and 2.5-3.5 micrometers wideIt has no definite shape and size. Its size varies. As it depends on the ovulation period.
Made up of It is made up of water, sugar, protein, vitamin C, Zinc, and Prostaglandins.It is mostly made up of water.

What is Sperm?

Sperm is a male gamete and a germ cell formed by the testis. It was first discovered by Antoine Van Leeuwenhoek in 1677. He considered that each unit of sperm contains a fully formed but small human. It can produce offspring after uniting with the ovum.
The normal shape of sperm has a smooth, oval-shaped head that is 5-6 micrometers long and 2.5-3.5 micrometers wide. The semen in which the sperm is contained is produced in urethral gland, prostate gland, and seminal vesicles.

The sperm has a streamlined body. It allows sperm to move rapidly to reach the target cell. It contains a head, body, and tail. All these parts contain various molecules and smaller structures that help to function sperm properly. The whole body is covered with a plasma membrane. The head of the sperm contains the nucleus. Below the head, the neck is present, which contains mitochondria. Mitochondria help to produce ATP energy. ATP is important for cell survival and the movement of the sperm. The tail is designed for active and smooth movement.

Sperm production is influenced by hormones. Sperm contains sperm cells and proteins. During the process of spermatogenesis, the formation of sperm cells takes place. Sperm cell has a limited life span. It can’t be divided into pieces. There are 23 chromosomes present in the human sperm cells. When these 23 chromosomes join with 23 chromosomes of the female egg. It helps in the production of offspring.

What is Cervical Mucus?

Cervical mucus is present in cervical linings. It is part of the female reproductive system. It is mostly made up of water. It also contains Sodium, Potassium, amino acids, etc. It has also the presence of glycerol, which increases during a sexual phase.
It is affected by the hormonal level. The thickness and amount of cervical mucus change, throughout a woman’s menstruation cycle. Cervical mucus helps to predict ovulation. It is whiteish in color and transparent throughout.

The size of Cervical Mucus varies. As it depends on the ovulation period. The method used to check the ovulation is called the spinnbarkeit method or cervical mucus method. Let’s know about the changes in the cervical mucus.At the time of the menstruation period, blood covers the mucus. So during this time, it is impossible to notice the changes in mucus. Immediately after the menstruation period, one might not notice any discharge.

Before the ovulation period, a women’s body produces mucus before the release of an egg. Its color may be yellow, white, or cloudy. Just before ovulation, estrogen levels are so high. There is more clearer, stretchy, and slippery mucus. During ovulation time, the presence of clear, stretchy mucus. The ph of mucus is protective for sperms. But after ovulation, mucus may turn thicker, cloudy, or gluey.

Main Differences Between Sperm and Cervical Mucus

  1. Sperm is produced in testicles, while Cervical Mucus is produced in the cervical linings.
  2. Sperm is a part of male reproductive system, while Cervical Mucus is the part of female reproductive system.
  3. Sperm has a tail-like structure, while cervical mucus has no definite shape.
  4. The color of sperm is usually white, while the color of cervical mucus is mostly transparent.
  5. The consistency of sperm may be thick or thin, but not stretchable, While the consistency of Cervical Mucus depends on the ovulation period.

Conclusion

Both cervical mucus and sperms are important for human beings. On the one side sperms are very useful for male. It helps to counter the depression tendency, decreases the risk of prostate cancer, improves the thinking abilities, etc. It also helps in better sleep as it contains melatonin that induces sleep and relaxation. While cervical mucus helps to prepare, filter, and release sperms for successful transport to the egg. Both are useful in the process of reproduction.

References

  1. https://rep.bioscientifica.com/view/journals/rep/78/1/jrf_78_1_011.xml
  2. https://content.iospress.com/articles/biorheology/bir17-1-2-18
x
2D vs 3D