Difference Between Ventricular Tachycardia And Ventricular Fibrillation (With Table)

The most common causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) are ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, especially in people with structural heart disease and decreased left ventricular function. It’s critical to distinguish between ventricular and supraventricular tachycardia. Ventricular arrhythmias range from those in which the heart is physically normal to those in which the heart is structurally abnormal. Each condition has its aetiology, treatment strategy, and prognosis.

Ventricular Tachycardia vs Ventricular Fibrillation

The difference between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation is that heart muscles contract at regular intervals in ventricular tachycardia. Still, in ventricular fibrillation, heart muscles do not display any contraction activity.

Ventricular tachycardia occurs when the ventricles contract at a rate of more than 100 times per minute. Pulseless VT is an emergency situation that happens when a ventricular contraction is so fast that the heart does not have much time to refill, resulting in an undetected pulse. People with valvular heart disease are more likely to develop this disorder.

Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is a dangerous heart rhythm that causes inefficient ventricular contractions. Ventricular Fibrillation is a condition in which the ventricle walls tremble rapidly and stop pumping. VF’s ventricular motion is unrelated to atrial contractions. A heart attack causes Ventricular fibrillation, which is a life-threatening condition.

Comparison Table Between Ventricular Tachycardia and Ventricular Fibrillation

Parameters Of ComparisonVentricular TachycardiaVentricular Fibrillation
Heart-Beat ContractionThe heart muscle contracts at regular intervals in Ventricular Tachycardia.Heart muscles do not show any contraction activity at regular time intervals in Ventricular fibrillation.
QRS ComplexesIn the ECG, Ventricular Tachycardia has regular QRS complexes.Ventricular fibrillation does not show QRS complexes in ECG.
ComplicacyVentricular tachycardia can be simple or complicated.Ventricular fibrillation cannot be subdivided.
Attention RequiredFor decades, Ventricular Tachycardia remains unnoticed.Ventricular fibrillation requires emergency attention.
Heart-BeatVentricular Tachycardia causes the heart rate to increase to 200 beats per minute.The heartbeat goes up to 350-500 beats per minute in Ventricular fibrillation.

What is Ventricular Tachycardia?

Electrical impulses regulate your heart rate. There is a pattern to these signals. The sinoatrial (SA) node is where they begin. It’s located in one of your atria and is known as the natural pacemaker of your heart.

Your atria contract as a result of the signal, causing blood to flow into your ventricles. It then travels to the atrioventricular (AV) node, which is a component of your heart. This causes your ventricles to contract and the blood to flow more freely.

If you’re older or someone in your family has a cardiac rhythm problem, you’re more likely to develop ventricular tachycardia. Other factors that might cause or increase your risk of developing VT include:

  1. Damage to your heart muscle caused by heart illness such as a heart attack, heart failure, heart valve disease, or inflammation (myocarditis)
  2. Sarcoidosis is a disease in which your body’s inflammatory tissues develop out of control.
  3. Long QT syndrome or Brugada syndrome are conditions you inherited from your parents.
  4. Medicines
  5. Electrolyte levels in your blood are unbalanced.
  6. Using a lot of alcohol or caffeine isn’t a good idea.
  7. Drugs used for recreation

Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia occurs when doctors are unable to identify a cause.

Diagnosis of Ventricular Tachycardia :
An EKG is most likely the first one you’ll receive. It monitors the electrical activity of your heart. Electrophysiology testing, which pinpoints trouble regions in the heart, may also be recommended by your doctor.

What is Ventricular Fibrillation?

Ventricular fibrillation (V-fib) is a form of arrhythmia or irregular heartbeat that is hazardous. It affects the ventricles of your heart. The ventricles are the two bottom chambers of your heart, a muscular system with four sections. Your blood flows evenly in and out of these chambers in a healthy heart. This allows blood to circulate freely throughout your body.

Ventricular fibrillation is an arrhythmia that originates in your ventricle. When the electrical signals that tell your heart muscle to pump are interrupted, your ventricles quiver (fibrillate). Your heart is quivering because it is not pumping blood out to your body. V-fib might occur multiple times a day in certain people.

Ventricular fibrillation has no recognised origin; however, it can arise due to some medical issues. V-fib is most often seen during or immediately after a heart attack. When the heart muscle receives insufficient blood supply, it can become electrically unstable, resulting in hazardous cardiac rhythms. V-fib can develop in a heart that has been injured by a cardiac attack or other heart muscle injury.

Electrolyte problems, such as low potassium, some medications, and genetic disorders that alter the heart’s ion channels or electrical conduction are other reasons.

Main Differences Between Ventricular Tachycardia and Ventricular Fibrillation

  1. In the ECG, Ventricular Tachycardia has regular QRS complexes while Ventricular fibrillation does not show QRS complexes in ECG.
  2. The heart muscle contracts at regular intervals in Ventricular Tachycardia while Heart muscles do not show any contraction activity at regular time intervals in Ventricular fibrillation.
  3. Ventricular tachycardia can be simple or complicated while Ventricular fibrillation cannot be subdivided.
  4. For decades, Ventricular Tachycardia remains unnoticed while Ventricular fibrillation requires emergency attention.
  5. Ventricular Tachycardia causes the heart rate to increase to 200 beats per minute while the heartbeat goes up to 350-500 beats per minute in Ventricular fibrillation.

Conclusion

Major arrhythmias include ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Both arise below the atrioventricular node in the ventricles (which is the secondary natural pacemaker of the heart). Ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation can be caused by myocardial infarction, myocardial inflammation, cardiomyopathies, electrolyte imbalances, and other metabolic disorders. Palpitations, chest discomfort, and trouble breathing are all signs of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. They are extremely hazardous since ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation are both symptoms of cardiac arrest in some people. Both of these diseases are life-threatening and need emergency room treatment right away.

References

  1. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1540-8167.1993.tb01236.x
  2. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/58594/
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