So vs Very: Difference and Comparison

“So” and “Very” are used in a sentence to help strengthen adverbs or adjectives. The two words help provide much-needed emphasis on the subject matter at hand.

Key Takeaways

  1. “So” is an adverb used to emphasize the extent or degree of quality, whereas “very” is an adverb that intensifies adjectives and adverbs.
  2. “So” can introduce a clause that explains the reason for an action, while “very” is solely used to modify adjectives or adverbs.
  3. “So” is more versatile, as it can also express causality, whereas “very” is limited to intensifying qualities.

So vs Very

The difference between So and Very is that the Very can introduce and provide new information, while So can emphasise that information. These two words differ primarily in the forms in which they are used.

So vs Very

The word “So” is used to emphasise a point being stated in a sentence as a form of an exclamation. It intensifies the structure of the sentence.

In its grammatical usage, the word “Very” can be used to intensify an adverb and help cement the fact being stated. But when used literally, it could also convey a large or small amount’.


 

Comparison Table

Parameter of ComparisonSoVery
Grammatical form“So” is present only as a degree adverb and is used with other adverbs and adjectives.The word “Very” exists in two forms – adjective and adverb and is accompanied by other adverbs or nouns.
Usages“So” can be used to – intensify a fact or a point, describe a task, provide a negation, or even confirm a tautology.Used to – emphasise information being provided, convey the size of something, or highlight the quality of something.
Substitution of wordsThe word “So” unlike “Very” cannot be substituted in place of words like “Really”.“Very” can be used instead of “Really” as they have similar meanings in the same context.
Example“They were so right when they said the burger was spicy.”
“Fold the napkins in the form of a rectangle like so.”
“There was a huge plane at the airstrip.”
“The breadsticks taste very good today.”
SynonymsAccordingly, consequently, therefore, thus.Extremely, vastly, tremendously, immensely.

 

When to Use So?

The word “So” during the use of Old English was purely intensive. But throughout the 1900s, as the English language developed, so did the various meanings of “So”.

Also Read:  Two vs Too: Difference and Comparison

One of the main usages of “So” in a sentence is to intensify the fact being conveyed. It helps to add an emphasis on the subject matter being relayed. This way allows one to exclaim a feeling as well. i

Example –

  1. The project handed out by the professor is so difficult; it just gives me a migraine!”
  2. “ I can never understand how someone could be so insensitive!”

Different use of “So” is also seen when one uses it to argue against a negation. This is not used in formal conversation and usually, is seen when children are talking.

so 1
 

When to Use Very?

The word “very” during the late 13th century was primarily used as a replacement for terms such as – genuine, actual, and sheer.

“Very” exists in two forms when looking through a grammatical perspective –

  1. Adjective
  2. Adverb

“Very” is also used to convey an object’s size, whether large or small and even compare two different proportions. 

Example –

  1. Yesterday at the aquarium, I saw a blue whale, and they are huge compared to any mammal on earth.”
  2. “I could only purchase a minimal amount of blue cheese at the supermarket.”
very

Main Differences Between So and Very

  1. “Very” can introduce new information in a sentence, while “So” can accompany it to emphasise the statement.
  2. In terms of synonyms, “So” has the same meaning as accordingly, consequently, therefore, thus. While “Very” is somewhat similar to vastly, tremendously, immensely.

Difference Between X and Y 2023 04 06T162834.153
References
  1. https://www.dictionary.com/browse/very
  2. https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=very

Last Updated : 11 June, 2023

dot 1

10 thoughts on “So vs Very: Difference and Comparison”

Leave a Comment

Want to save this article for later? Click the heart in the bottom right corner to save to your own articles box!