Difference Between Allusive, Elusive and Illusive (With Table)

‘Allusive, illusive, and elusive’ are all words with very identical meanings. They all have the same root term, but they don’t have the same meaning when used in phrases or speech. They primarily differ from one other in terms of vowel sound at first. All of these words are derived from the Latin phrase ‘ludo.’

Allusive vs Elusive vs Illusive

The difference between allusive, elusive and ‘illusive’ is that “I mimic” or “I mock” is how the word “allusive” came into being. ‘Elusive,’ on the other hand, comes from the term “deceit.” However, on the contrary, “Illusive” comes from a word that means “to betray or deception.”

“Allusive” starts with the Latin prefix “ad-,” which means “to.” ‘Allusive’ is an adjective with the basic term ‘allude.’ The adjective version of the term ‘Allusive’ is to imply someone or to allude to something in an indirect manner. “The restaurant menu was so allusive that it contained photos of meals on every page,” is a sentence formed with allusive.

The Latin prefix “e-” is utilised in “elusive,” and it means “to run from deception” or “to come out of.” ‘Elusive’, on the other hand, has an adjective root form of ‘elude.’ The adjective version of the term ‘Elusive,’ on the other hand, indicates to shrug off someone who can follow or flee anything. “The terrorists managed to avoid cops even after strong security” is an example of sentences made utilising elusive.

“Illusive” comes from a word that means “deceit.” “In-” is a Latin prefix that means “upon,” “at,” “to deceive,” and “illusion upon.” ‘Illusive’ is an adjective with the essential term ‘illusion.’ The word “illusion” is the root form of Illusive, and it refers to something that is imagined or appears to exist but does not. “The nomads in the Atacama desert were illusive about ponds in every 5 minutes distance,” for example, is a phrase made with the word illusive.

Comparison Table Between Allusive, Elusive and Illusive

Parameters of ComparisonAllusiveElusiveIllusive
Origin“I mimic”, ‘I mock”“Deception”“Deception”
Latin prefix used“Ad-““E-” “In-“
Latin prefix meaning“To” “out of”, getting out of depressionAt, upon (to deceive, illusion upon)
Adjective base form AlludeEludeIllusion
Adjective form meaningSuggesting someone, referring something indirectly Shaking off a pursuerTo seem something that in reality is not.

What is Allusive?

The word ‘allusive’ comes from the Latin phrase “I mimic” or “I mock.” “Allusive” is prefixed with the Latin prefix “ad-,” which means “to.” ‘Allusive’ has an adjective root form of ‘allude.’ The adjective version of the word ‘Allusive’ implies to imply someone or to refer to something indirectly.

This word is used widely in the language of English and day to day conversations also. It is not limited to a certain meaning or use. “The terrorists managed to elude cops even after strong security” is a sentence formed with allusive.

Most of the time, the word “allusive” is mistaken and used as “elusive”. However, both the words and their usage are different from each other. When a lawyer feels pity for his client’s situation, then the “allusive” word can be used. For example, the public prosecutor felt allusive about the defendant‘s state and consequence.

What is Elusive?

The word ‘elusive’, on the other hand, comes from the word “deceit.” The Latin prefix “e-” is utilised in “elusive,” and it means “to flee from deception” or “to get out of.” The adjective base form of ‘Elusive’, on the other hand, is ‘elude.’

The adjective version of the term ‘Elusive,’ on the other hand, indicates to shrug off someone who can follow or flee from anything. “The restaurant menu was so allusive that it contained photographs of food on every page,” says one line formed with elusive. Anything miraculous is generally referred to by this term.

Those maladies or matters, which are hard to understand, are generally referred to with the help of the word elusive. The word “allusive” is frequently misunderstood and replaced with “elusive.” However, the meanings of the words and how they are used differently.

What is Illusive?

The word “elusive” is derived from a word that means “deceit.” The Latin prefix “in-” is utilized in illusive, and it means “upon,” “upon,” “to deceive,” and “illusion upon.” The basic form of the adjective ‘illusive’ is ‘illusion.’

The word, Illusion is widespread yet popular in the English language and frequently used as well. It refers to something that isn’t real. For example, to the desert dwellers, sand appears as water to them, and it’s called a mirage, which an illusion. As there is no water present in nature, but everywhere, it’s just sand. If being ‘elusive’ is a set then, being ‘illusive’ is its subset.

“Illusion” is the original base form of Illusive, and it refers to something that is imagined or appears to be something that does not exist. “The nomads in the Sahara desert were elusive about water presence in every 5 minutes distance,” says one phrase constructed with illusive.

Main Differences Between Allusive, Elusive and Illusive

  1. The word ‘Allusive’ has been originated from the meaning of “I mimic” or ‘I mock.” However, the word ‘Elusive’ has been originated from the word “deception.” On the other hand, The word “Illusive” originated from the word meaning “deception.”
  2. The Latin prefix used in “allusive” is “ad-,” which comes in the meaning of ‘to.’ However, the Latin prefix used in “elusive” is “e-,” which comes in the meaning of fleeing; from deception or ‘out of.’ On the other hand, the Latin prefix used in illusive is “in-,” which comes in the meaning of “upon,” “at,” “to deceive,” and “illusion upon.”
  3. The adjective base form of ‘Allusive’ is ‘allude.’ However, the adjective base form of ‘Elusive’ is ‘elude.’ On the other hand, the adjective base form of ‘Illusive’ is ‘illusion.’
  4. The adjective form word of ‘Allusive’ means suggesting someone or referring indirectly to something. However, the adjective form word of the word ‘Elusive’ means to shake off someone who has the potential to pursue or escape from something. On the other hand, The original base form of Illusive, which is “illusion,” refers to something that is imaginary or seems something that does not exist.
  5. A sentence formed with allusive and elusive is that ” the restaurant menu was so allusive that it had pictures of dishes on every page” and “the terrorists managed to elude from cops even after high security.” On the other hand, a sentence formed with illusive can be said like, ” the nomads in Atacama desert were elusive about ponds in every 5 minutes distance”.

Conclusion

All three words, ‘allusive,’ ‘illusive,’ and ‘elusive,’ have almost similar meanings. However, they all possess the same root word but do not display the same meaning when used in sentences or conversations. They primarily differ from each other at the beginning in terms of a vowel sound. All of these words have been originated from ‘ludo,’ which is Latin terminology.

To conclude, the term “allusive” refers to something that provides a hint, reference, or another form of indirect communication. The term ‘elusive’ refers to something difficult to locate, capture or understood. The term ‘illusive’ refers to something that has to do with illusions or other aspects of a condition of unreality, such as something that appears to be insurmountable.

References

  1. https://cedar.wwu.edu/jec/vol14/iss1/1/
  2. https://www.jstor.org/stable/30091644
  3. http://www.lingref.com/cpp/hel-lex/2008/paper2168.pdf
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