Difference Between Retinol and Retin A (With Table)

When it comes to acne treatments, you’ve probably heard of retinol and Retin-A. At first look, they appear to be nearly identical: they have common similarities and can both be used to treat acne. While they share a lot in common, they also have some significant distinctions. Knowing a little about them can assist you in determining which is the best fit for you.

Retinol vs Retin A

The main difference between Retinol and Retin A is that Retinol is a component of many over-the-counter (OTC) skincare treatments, whereas Retin-A is a prescription acne treatment that has been approved by the FDA. Acne can be prevented with both retinol and Retin-A. Using both of the things together could speed up the recovery.

Many products that do not require a prescription contain retinol. Retinols are substantially weaker than retinoids prescribed by a doctor. If vitamin A isn’t listed among the top five ingredients and the product isn’t packaged in an airtight opaque bottle, it’s unlikely to be effective. Breastfeeding or pregnant women should avoid using retinoids or retinol.

Retin-A are available as prescription medications as well as over-the-counter medicines. Tretinoin, Tazarotene, and Adapalene are the three prescription-level retinoids. All 3 groups work together to keep dead cells out of the skin’s pores and pores while also encouraging the creation of healthy cells. Dryness, redness, inflammation, and skin peeling are all common symptoms, as well as causing skin more susceptible to the sun

Comparison Table Between Retinol and Retin A

Parameters of ComparisonRetinolRetin A
Made ofGentler version of Vitamin AA man-made version of Vitamin A
WorkWorks slowGives result faster
Long runRetinol doesn’t go deep in the skin but is good for long use.Retin A penetrates skin deep and gives skin results soon.
After effectGives skin a little raw lookMakes skin look brighter and also helps in removing marks.
Stays in skinRetinol doesn’t stay much longer in the skin so it could be used multiple times.It stays in the skin for more than 2 days

What is Retinol?

Retinol is a weaker form of vitamin A which could also be found in a variety of different skincare products (i.e. moisturizers, eye creams, serums). Because Retinol is gentler, our skin’s enzymes must first convert it to retinoic acid. It will become effective after it has been transformed. This is why, when compared to Retin-A, retinoids take longer to produce effects. A retinol product might take anywhere from eight to twelve weeks to show benefits.

Many who don’t know how to use the medication properly, will discuss the proper way of using the medication. After having a shower in the evening, apply retinol. Apply a moisturiser afterwards to prevent the drug from drying out your skin. Check that the moisturiser is “non-comedogenic,” which indicates it won’t clog your pores. Otherwise, it may aggravate the acne. Only a pea-sized quantity should be applied to your entire face.

Applying too much might create further skin dryness and will not speed up the process. It’s fine to apply the medicine to the skin surrounding your eyes, but avoid getting it in your eyes. Retinol should not be used in conjunction with benzoyl peroxide (a medication found in many over-the-counter acne treatments). Retin-A may not work correctly if you use benzoyl peroxide.

What is Retin A?

Tretinoin is marketed under the brand name Retin-A. Retin-A is a manmade version of vitamin A which could only be prescribed by doctors and couldn’t be availed by prescription. Retinoic acid is a Tretinoin that is used as a main active component. When we administer Retin-A (Tretinoin) topically, our bodies do not need to change it into retinoic acid, which makes it work faster and more effectively.

Results might be visible in as little as 6-8 weeks. Furthermore, Retin-A is available in a number of strengths, including the lowest, 0.5 per cent, and 1.0 per cent (the strongest). You should absolutely start with the lowest dose once or twice a week. Allow your skin to acclimate before gradually increasing the strengths.

The three prescription-level retinoids are tretinoin, tazarotene, and adapalene. All three groups collaborate to keep dead cells out of the skin’s pores and pores while simultaneously supporting the formation of healthy cells. Dryness, redness, inflammation, and skin peeling are all frequent signs, as well as making skin more vulnerable to the sun.

People might notice some side effects which vary from person to person. Some people face issues like redness, itching and stinging. With the usage of this medicine, skin becomes sensitive so extra care is required during the medication.

Main Differences Between Retinol and Retin A

  1. Retinol is a gentler version of Vitamin A whereas Retin A is a man made version with required modification for better results.
  2. Retinol gives the result over time whereas people looking for instant results use Retin A.
  3. Retinol gives the skin a raw look where Retin A makes skin look brighter and heals the scars and wrinkles.
  4. Retinol doesn’t go deep in skin whereas the Retin A penetrates deep in skin.
  5. Retinol could be used once in a day as it doesn’t stay for much longer on skin whereas Retin A stays in skin for 3 days so people don’t need to use it multiple times.

Conclusion

Whenever dead skin cells combine with oils from your skin’s glands to clog pores. Retinoids like retinol and Retin-A speed up the development of new skill cells in your skin, pushing away old cells and unclogging pores which help in reducing acne. Dry skin is the most prevalent retinol and Retin-A adverse effect, which can cause redness, irritation, and stinging. This is one of the reasons why, when you first start using them, your acne may appear to be worse.

But don’t be concerned: just keep going! It can take up to 12 weeks to notice the full effects of these drugs. Retinol and Retin-A can make you more sensitive to the sun, which is why you should use them at night. While you’re taking them, make sure you’re protected from the sun. Wear sunscreen, seek shade, and protect yourself with clothing, a hat, and sunglasses.

References

  1. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa021171
  2. https://febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1432-1033.1976.tb10390.x

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Editorial Staff at Ask Any Difference is a team of experts in the field of "Difference Between" topics and led by Sandeep Bhandari, Piyush Yadav and Chara Yadav. Trusted by over 1.5 million readers worldwide
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