Frog vs Toad: Difference and Comparison

Amphibians are tetrapods, i.e., four limbs vertebrates that have a relatively higher body temperature internally. It belongs to the phylum Vertebrae and the class of Amphibia.

Key Takeaways

  1. Frogs have smooth, moist skin, while toads have dry, bumpy skin.
  2. Frogs have long, strong hind legs for jumping and swimming, whereas toads have shorter, less muscular legs for walking and hopping.
  3. Frogs live near water and lay eggs in clusters, while toads can live in drier environments and lay eggs in long chains.

Frog vs Toad

A frog is a class of various lean, slender, and smooth-looking tailless leaping amphibians that look wet even when they are out of the water. Not all frogs are poisonous. A toad is a warty-looking tailless leaping amphibian with dry skin that is covered in little lumps and bumps. All toads are poisonous.

Frog vs Toad
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Frog is the tailless amphibians that are thin and slimy than toads. Largely they are carnivorous and belong to the order of Anura. Frogs are among the five most diverse vertebrates.

The toad is a member of Bufoniade, which is also called a true toad. They have dry skin, short legs, a bumpy body that covers the parotid glands.

Comparison Table

Parameters of ComparisonFrogToad
LocomotionJumps or HopsCrawls
AppearanceLean and slenderStubby, bumpy and short
HabitatLives in waterLives inland
EggsIn clustersIn chains
FeetWebbed feetDo not have webbed feet

What is Frog?

Frog comes from the Old English word ‘frogga,’ which means animal tail, and it belongs to the order of Anura. The fossil of frogs was first discovered in Madagascar, which dates back to 265 million years ago.

Frogs belong to various families like Hylidae, Microhylidae, Craugastoridae, and Bufonidae, which are very rich in species. The skin of the frogs is very protective, and they function as a respiratory organ.

They are cold-blooded animals which means they can regulate the temperature. The defensive mechanism which frogs use is called camouflage, in which they blend themselves according to the situation and remain undetected.

frog

What is Toad? 

Toads also belong to the order Anura, and they are members of Bufonidae.

It is believed that Bufoniade originated in South America when there was a breakup of Gondwana some 70-90 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period.

Toads are toothless and have a pair of glands at the back of their heads called parotid glands. These glands, when excreted, release poison, causing different effects.

570 species of the Bufoniade family have been found, which belong to 52 genera. Common toads or European toads can be found in almost every part of Europe, North-west Africa, and North-Asia except in Ireland, Iceland, and the Mediterranean.

toad

Main Differences Between Frog and Toad

  1. Eggs laid by frogs are in clusters. Eggs laid by toads are in chains.
  2. Frogs have webbed feet, which helps them in semi-aquatic conditions. Toads do not possess webbed feet.
Difference Between Frog and Toad
References
  1. http://www.lee.net/app/awards/2013/spirit/finalists/Casper%20exhibits/MyTrib9.17.pdf
  2. https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1890/03-5408

Last Updated : 20 July, 2023

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