Difference Between Corn Syrup and High Fructose Corn Syrup (With Table)

Sweeteners are an indispensable part of most sweet food items. They have a practical application in processed foods. Corn Syrup and High Fructose Corn Syrup are two types of sweeteners made out of cornstarch. While the two may seem similar, they have considerable differences in their properties and uses.

Corn Syrup vs High Fructose Corn Syrup 

The difference between corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup is that the composition of corn syrup consists of glucose only. On the other hand, high fructose corn syrup consists of some amount of glucose as fructose. Moreover, corn syrup is is not as sweet as high fructose corn syrup. 

Corn syrup refers to a syrup that has corn starch as raw material. It is a constituent of almost all pancake syrups as a substitute for the rather expensive maple syrup. In addition, dextrose equivalent ratings help evaluate different grades of corn syrup. Another name of corn syrup is glucose syrup. It has multiple uses and advantages. 

High Fructose Corn Syrup is a safe ingredient for food and beverage manufacturing.  It is also known as glucose-fructose, glucose-fructose syrup, and isoglucose. HFCs are easier to manufacture and handle.  Moreover, it is considerably cheaper than sucrose. Wheat, potatoes, and rice serve as sources of cornstarch for High Fructose Corn Syrup. 

Comparison Table Between Corn Syrup and High Fructose Corn Syrup 

Parameters of ComparisonCorn SyrupHigh Fructose Corn Syrup
DefinitionCorn syrup refers to a food syrup which has maze, maltose, and oligosaccharides as its main ingredients.High Fructose Corn Syrup refers to a sweet syrup that makes use of corn starch as its raw material. 
SweetnessCorn syrup is less sweeter than high fructose corn syrup.High fructose corn syrup is proportionately way too sweeter than corn syrup. 
Glucose contentCorn syrup consists entirely of glucose.High fructose corn syrup consists of some glucose as fructose. 
UseCorn syrup is found in almost all pancake syrups as a substitute to the rather expensive maple syrup. High Fructose Corn Syrup has a use in jams, jellies, baked goods, and many other food products. 
Another NameAnother name of corn syrup is glucose syrup. Another name of High Fructose Corn Syrup is isoglucose. 

What is Corn Syrup?

Corn syrup refers to a food syrup that has a maze, maltose, and oligosaccharides as its main ingredients. The proportion of these constituents varies from one variety of corn syrup to the other. Another name of corn syrup is glucose syrup. It has a practical application in foods to add volume, soften texture, enhance flavour, and prevent the crystallisation of sugar. 

Corn syrup has several uses. It is a vital part of commercially prepared food items as a sweetener, thickener, and humectant. Corn syrup is a component of almost all pancake syrups as a substitute for the rather expensive maple syrup.

Corn syrup is readily available for consumption as light corn syrup and dark corn syrup in the market. Light corn syrup has a clear and moderately sweet taste. On the other hand, dark corn syrup is a warm brown colour. Dark corn syrup consists of molasses, which enhance its flavour. 

The extent of hydrolysis reaction determines the sweetness and viscosity of corn syrup. Dextrose equivalent ratings help evaluate different grades of corn syrup.  

What is High Fructose Corn Syrup?

High Fructose Corn Syrup is a sweet syrup that uses corn starch as a raw material. Another name of High Fructose Corn Syrup isoglucose. HFCs is a safe raw material for the manufacture of food and beverages. 

In China, HFC makes up 20% of the sweetener demand. Another name of HFC in Japan is isomerized sugar. HFC is a component of adulterated honey. HFC consists of 76% carbohydrates, and 24% water. It doesn’t contain any fats, proteins, or micronutrients. 

High Fructose Corn Syrup is a part of jams, jellies, baked goods, and many other food products. It has a practical application in the manufacture of soft drinks. Moreover, it is considerably cheaper than sucrose. Wheat, potatoes, and rice serve as sources of corn starch for High Fructose Corn Syrup. 

High Fructose Corn Syrup is cost-effective and offers an ideal sugar level. It consists of 24% water, fructose, and glucose. High Fructose Corn Syrup is a constituent in breakfast cereals and processed food items. To conclude, High Fructose Corn Syrup has varying characteristics and uses. 

Main Differences Between Corn Syrup and High Fructose Corn Syrup 

  1. Corn syrup refers to a food syrup that has a maze, maltose, and oligosaccharides as its main ingredients. In contrast, High Fructose Corn Syrup refers to a syrup that uses corn starch as raw material. 
  2. Corn syrup is less sweet than high fructose corn syrup. On the other hand, High fructose corn syrup is sweeter than corn syrup.
  3. Corn syrup comprises entirely of glucose. In contrast, High fructose corn syrup consists of some glucose in the form of fructose.
  4. Corn syrup is a component of almost all pancake syrups as a substitute for the rather expensive maple syrup. On the other hand, High Fructose Corn Syrup has use in jams, jellies, baked goods, and many other food products. 
  5. Another name of corn syrup is glucose syrup. In contrast, other names of High Fructose Corn Syrup are glucose-fructose, and isoglucose. 

Conclusion

Thus, corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup have visible differences in their basic composition, uses, and origin. Corn Syrup has a practical application in foods to add volume, soften texture, enhance flavour, and prevent crystallisation of sugar. The extent of hydrolysis reaction determines the sweetness and viscosity of corn syrup.

High Fructose Corn Syrup doesn’t contain any fats, proteins, or micronutrients. Moreover, it is considerably cheaper than sucrose. Wheat, potatoes, and rice serve as sources of corn starch for High Fructose Corn Syrup. To conclude, corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup vary on several grounds. 

References

  1. https://academicjournals.org/Journal/BMBR/article-abstract/41CAC0411547 
  2. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/88/6/1716S/4617107?gca=88%252F6%252F1715S&gca=88%252F6%252F1716S&gca=88%252F6%252F1722S&gca=88%252F6%252F1733S&gca=88%252F6%252F1738S&sendit=Get%20All%20Checked%20Abstract(s) 
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